FEATURED INVESTMENTS: SUSTAINABLE INVESTMENTS IN AGRICULTURE, MARCH 2015

Increased investment in agriculture can accelerate sustainable development and help meet growing domestic, regional and global food security needs. Yet, if not structured equitably or regulated carefully, these investments can also lead to social and environmental degradation. These risks have only heightened as investments in land for agriculture have become increasingly attractive to foreign investors and host countries alike.Timor 3

To help address these challenges, CCSI has designed an Executive Training on Sustainable Investments in Agriculture. This program, based on CCSI’s successful Executive Training on Extractive Industries and Sustainable Development, will be held in New York City from March 9-14, 2015. The program will provide an interdisciplinary approach to addressing the challenges and opportunities of agricultural investments. It is designed to equip participants with the necessary knowledge and skills to address some of the key issues posed by such investments, and to encourage a rich dialogue about practices from around the globe. By working through case studies and with practitioners, participants will focus on how to use analytical tools and frameworks to harness agricultural investments for sustainable development. For more information, or to apply, please visit our website.

FEATURED RESEARCH: THE GAP IN LIABILITY UNDER DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL LAW

As governments around the world are negotiating investment treaties, CCSI is researching how the protections offered to investors and the potential liabilities faced by governments under these agreements compare with the systems set up under domestic law. On May 21, 2014, CCSI Legal Researcher Lise Johnson presented a summary of that research at the stakeholder forum during the fifth round of negotiations on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (T-TIP) negotiations in Washington DC. myth-stability

Her comments and PowerPoint briefly highlighted how investment treaty arbitrations to date have interpreted standards of protections in investment treaties to go beyond protections offered to investors under US law, exposing the government to a greater risk of liability and shifting a greater share of the risk of regulation from the private to the public sector. CCSI is conducting similar comparative law analysis on other jurisdictions including Australia, Canada, India, and Japan.

For more information on this and other relevant research, please visit our Investment Law and Policy page.